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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of Cortical oscillations in health and disease found in the catalog.

Cortical oscillations in health and disease

Roger D. Traub

Cortical oscillations in health and disease

by Roger D. Traub

  • 39 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cerebral cortex -- Pathophysiology,
  • Cerebral cortex,
  • Oscillations,
  • Neurobehavioral disorders,
  • Neocortex -- physiology,
  • Periodicity,
  • Neocortex -- physiopathology

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementRoger D. Traub, Miles A. Whittington.
    ContributionsWhittington, Miles A.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC386.2 .T73 2010
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23928756M
    ISBN 109780195342796
    LC Control Number2009039142

      Our combined EEG and LFP recordings further revealed that sigma–beta oscillations were specifically linked to cortical spindle density in rats (Fig. 7f), which taken together with the dendritic Cited by: What is oscillating? The electromagnetic field caused by (1) certain types of nerve cells(neurons) that can generate rhythmic firing/spiking on their own without any.

    Oscillations in a given frequency band are the results of synchronization across neurons. Indeed, motor-related cortical oscillations are generally assessed by quantifying increases (also called event-related synchronizations or ERS) or decreases (event-related desynchronizations or ERD) in spectral power in a given frequency : Arnaud Delval, Madli Bayot, Luc Defebvre, Kathy Dujardin. The study of cortical oscillations is of great interest to those working in many areas of neuroscience. A fast coherent EEG rhythm called gamma or "40 Hz" has been implicated in cognition, as it may play a role in binding together features of objects. This rhythm may also be important for consciousness, as a number of drugs that induce general anesthesia disrupt the .

    cortical feedback to the thalamus is a major factor in the amplification of thalamocortical oscillations (2, 7, 45). With their increasing commitment to an oscillatory network, the responsiveness of neurons to external inputs progressively decreases. As a result, thalamo-cortical spindle oscillations effectively re-File Size: KB. The thalamus plays a major role in generating many rhythmic brain oscillations yet, little is known about the role of the thalamus in neurodegeneration and whether or not thalamus atrophy is a primary or secondary phenomenon to hippocampal or neo cortical loss in by: 3.


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Cortical oscillations in health and disease by Roger D. Traub Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Cortical Oscillations in Health and Disease reveals the current thinking of two of the leading researchers on cortical oscillations, covering advances in the field in the last decade. It presents new work in a rich historical context, with lots of detail, but also syntheses of current and past ideas about both mechanism and function/5(2).

Request PDF | Cortical Oscillations in Health and Disease | This book reviews a number of clinical neuropsychiatric conditions in which brain oscillations play an essential role.

It. "Traub and Whittington's Cortical Oscillations in Health and Disease is a tour de force presentation of one of the pivotal concepts in modern neuroscience: the dynamic electrical organization of the Its treatment of the role of oscillatory coherence in the organization of temporal binding, based on the intrinsic neuronal properties and their.

This book reviews a number of clinical neuropsychiatric conditions in which brain oscillations play an essential role. It discusses how the intrinsic properties of neurons, and the interactions between neurons – mediated by both chemical synapses and by gap junctions – can lead to oscillations in populations of cells.

The discussion is based largely on data derived from in vitro. Cortical Oscillations in Health and Disease Roger D. Traub, Miles A. Whittington, pp., Oxford University Press,$ In Cortical Oscillations in Health and Disease, Traub and Whittington review and coalesce a century's worth of neurophysiologic data in a complete yet readable form, focusing on the important developments, presenting detail where Author: Matt Stead.

Get this from a library. Cortical oscillations in health and disease. [Roger D Traub; Miles A Whittington; Oxford University Press.] -- This book reviews a number of clinical neuropsychiatric conditions in which brain oscillations play an essential role. It discusses how the intrinsic properties of neurons, and the interactions.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Cortical Oscillations in Health and Disease by Miles A. Whittington and Roger D.

Traub (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at eBay. Free shipping for many products. Cortical Oscillations in Health and Disease. First Edition. Roger Traub, MD and Miles Whittington, PhD. challenges the standard neural network theories; the text is a continuation of the controversy between Golgi and Cajal in the late 19th century, on whether the brain was one vast "reticular" syncytium, or whether it was constituted of.

"Traub and Whittington's Cortical Oscillations in Health and Disease is a tour de force presentation of one of the pivotal concepts in modern neuroscience: the dynamic electrical organization of the brain's cortical mantle.

Its treatment of the role of oscillatory coherence in the organization of temporal binding, based on the intrinsic /5(2). Cortical Oscillation In Health & Disease (H) OUP New York This book first reviews the case that brain oscillations not only are important for cognition, as long suspected, but also play a part in the expression of signs and symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders.

The cellular mechanisms of many of the clinically relevant oscillations have been. Neural oscillations, or brainwaves, are rhythmic or repetitive patterns of neural activity in the central nervous system. Neural tissue can generate oscillatory activity in many ways, driven either by mechanisms within individual neurons or by interactions between neurons.

In individual neurons, oscillations can appear either as oscillations in membrane potential or as rhythmic. cortical oscillations: Neurology Cortical rhythms that range from Hz–theta waves during sleep, to Hz waves while aroused; COs are generated and synchronized by layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the neocortex.

See Chaos. Magnetoencephalography: From Signals to Dynamic Cortical and source localization techniques to dynamic functional networks underlying perception and cognition in both health and disease.

sensory-motor integration, MEG studies on perception and cognition, thalamocortical oscillations, fetal and neonatal MEG, pediatric MEG studies Format: Hardcover.

Cortical oscillations and language functional organization. Intrinsic asymmetries in cortical oscillations are observed not only in auditory cortex. The phenomenon is even more marked in motor cortex, specifically in tongue, lip and hand regions, where theta and low and high gamma activity appear strongly left dominant Resting oscillatory Cited by: Introduction.

The term “brain (or neural) oscillations” refers to the rhythmic and/or repetitive electrical activity generated spontaneously and in response to stimuli by neural tissue in the central nervous system, the discovery of which is generally credited to Hans Berger (), the recorder of the first by: Purpose: In this study, we investigate the modification to cortical oscillations of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) by subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS).

Methods: Spontaneous cortical oscillations of patients with PD were recorded with magnetoencephalography during on and off subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

Cortical gamma oscillations ( Hz) predict increases in focused attention, and failure in gamma regulation is a hallmark of neurological and psychiatric disease. The mechanisms underlying this oscillatory behavior are partly elucidated at the neuronal level.

Studies have shown that slow oscillations are expressed within various cortical areas and by virtually all neuronal types, and they display wide-range and short-range cortical synchronization. There is a large current sink in cortical layer III. Parkinson's Disease is associated with loss of brainstem dopaminergic neurons, and loss of dopaminergic innervation of basal ganglia and cortex.

The most disabling clinical symptoms are slowness of movement and postural instability. Both in the clinical disorder, and in experimental models, dopaminergic deprivation leads to enhanced beta oscillations (~20 – 30 Hz) in motor. Oscillations in the gamma range ( Hz) are found over multiple cortical areas of several species 2 and are thought to be involved with feature binding and visual attention.

Feature binding refers to the complex process by which different components or features of an object are "linked" so they are perceived as a single object, even Cited by:. Cortical oscillations and sensory predictive mechanisms. Our sensory environment is full of regularities, for example, repetitive stimuli and contexts, which we use to predict future events.

A popular hypothesis is that the brain hosts internalized representations of the world from which it predicts “what’ happens in the sensory by: Cortical oscillations and sensory predictions Luc H.

Arnal1,2 and Anne-Lise Giraud1 1Inserm 2 U De ´partement d’Etudes Cognitives, Ecole Normale Superieure, 29 rue d’Ulm Paris, France Department of Psychology, New York University, 6 Washington Place, New York, NYUSA Many theories of perception are anchored in the central.While the muscular activity of legs and cortical activity are coupled, the precise role of the motor cortex to control the level of muscular contraction according to the gait task remains debated.

The decoding of this brain activity is a necessary step to build valid brain–computer interfaces able to generate gait : Arnaud Delval, Madli Bayot, Luc Defebvre, Kathy Dujardin.